April’s Top Marketing Campaigns: Content for a Cause

This month, we’ve been focusing on campaigns with a cause. Content from Greenpeace, Battersea and others has been bringing attention to issues including global warming and mental health.

From clever chatbots to total rebrands, these are the brands campaigning for change – and they’re using great content to do it.

Let’s Drink Better Association – My Liver Chatbot

We’re kicking off this month’s content round-up with the quirky. Let’s Drink Better is a group that wants to encourage responsible drinking – and they’ve come up with a genius way of doing so. Introducing: the My Liver chatbot. It’s built into Facebook Messenger and helps you keep track of your drinking.

You can chat to My Liver on a night out and record the number of drinks you have. You can even check how drunk you are with games like sequence memory tasks. The chatbot will give you tips on how to drink responsibly – and has a characteristically bold and brassy way of doing it. The next morning, you’ll get a full report on what you’ve drunk, along with some constructive feedback on how well you’ve managed to stay within your limits…

Check out the cheeky chatbot below.

The Book of Man

The Book of Man is a new media brand that publishes digital content offering advice to modern men. Covering subjects from mental health to gadgets, the brand looks like it’ll be a huge content hub going forward (they’ve already collaborated with CALM, and rapper/mental health campaigner Professor Green will be writing a fortnightly column).

The brains behind the new website is writer Martin Robinson. His aim for The Book of Man is to question preconceived ideas of masculinity and provide advice and skills to help men tackle these issues.

RHP Content for a Cause Book of Man

Project Literacy – Daunting World

Project Literacy is tackling the problem of illiteracy worldwide. According to their data, 1 in every 10 people can’t read, and by 2030 Project Literacy want to make sure everyone can. The Daunting World campaign shows what it’s like to be an adult that struggles to read and write.

Everyday situations are shown through a series of colourful images. But when you look closer, the images show how difficult these situations can be for adults who can’t read. The ads have been rolled out across social media to raise awareness of the issue.

RHP Content for a Cause Feature Project Literacy

Greenpeace – Ocean of the Future

UK supermarkets generate 8,000 tonnes of plastic every year, and Greenpeace are drawing attention to the damage it’s causing our oceans. They’ve created a short film that imagines what a school trip to the aquarium will look like in the future. Fish are replaced by plastic bags, bottles and packaging to show what the ocean’s future might look like if we don’t reduce plastic waste.

The short film has been running across social media channels this month. Greenpeace are using it to get signatures for their petition, asking supermarkets to ditch plastic packaging, and it’s nearly reached its goal of 500,000 names.

 

Battersea Dogs and Cats Home

Battersea Dogs and Cats Home has undergone a rebrand. With a little help from design consultancy Pentagram, the charity has updated its identity and website to be in line with its brand values. Hiromi Suzuki was commissioned to illustrate cute watercolour images to feature on Battersea’s merchandise and communications. Battersea’s rebrand is probably most obvious on their website.

From the updated homepage that showcases videos of the animals, to the individual webpages for each cat or dog. CTAs have been made bigger and bolder to encourage donations, and a focus on studio photography means Battersea can really do justice to the rescue animals looking for their forever homes.

We hope you liked these content campaigns as much as we did. We’ll keep our eyes peeled for the best content appearing in May and put them in another handy round-up – so be sure to check in then.

 

 

RHP Content for a Cause Feature

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